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#Bulgarian customs and traditions Program

Bulgarian Customs and Traditions

The Bulgarian Customs and Traditions program is inspired by the ancient traditions that have preserved the spirit of the Bulgarian people throughout the centuries. Bulgarian traditions are an interesting mix of Christian beliefs and pagan rituals. The entire life of many generations of Bulgarians has been directly linked to the cycles of nature and agricultural work.

The Bulgarian Customs and Traditions program includes several collections that present the specific aspects of the Bulgarian customs and traditions. The entire program features color printing of the obverse of the medals, which further emphasizes the deep and detailed relief and makes the composition stand out. Floral details on the reverse of the medal recreate a traditional hand embroidery from the Samokov area.

Koleduvane

Christmas is one of the traditional Bulgarian customs, which is performed from midnight on Christmas Eve to sunrise on Christmas. Over the centuries, its pagan roots have intertwined with Christianity to become an integral part of the Bulgarian holiday rituals.

The Christmas party consists of an odd number of young bachelor men, led by an older man - a "stanenik", who must be married. Preparations for "koleduvane" begin on December 20th (the date is associated with the winter solstice) when the group gathers at the stanenik's home. Then they began to study carols, which, as a rule, could not be performed at other times of the year. This is not an easy task, as a band's repertoire can include about 50 songs.

The costumes of the "koledari" are festive - they must wear a gag and a yamurluk, and they put fur hats (kalpak) on their heads, decorated with wreaths of boxwood, flowers or popcorn. After dinner on Christmas Eve, the group leaves the stanenik's home and walks past the whole village or a pre-determined neighbourhood until sunrise. They sing songs on the streets and in front of the houses to alert the owners of their arrival. According to tradition, the koledari go around the houses at night, because the sun should not catch them on the road.

The carolers are welcome guests and each family prepares to welcome them. The old people say that if koledari do not visit the house, the year will be barren. It is believed that along with songs, blessings and chants, luck and prosperity come into the home.

The koledari sing a song for everyone in the home, starting with the oldest. They sing and bless for health, prosperity and well-being. In acknowledgement, the hosts gift them with money or flour, wine, fruit - whatever they have produced, and the hostess gives a Christmas bread ("harman") to the stanenik. If there is a girl in the house and her beloved is in the group, she should prepare a special piece of bakery and give it to him as an expression of her affection.

The koleduvane ends with a feast for the carolers in the home of the stanenik. It is made between Christmas and St. Ivan's Day (January 6th), when the collected gifts are distributed to the poor, schools and others.

According to folklore, songs and blessings can drive away supernatural creatures such as goblins and karakonjuli, which appear before Christmas so that the new universe can be born and the world reorganized. Koledari's songs and blessings are believed to have the magical power to ward off evil forces and bring good luck to homes in the new year.

Storage

Storage of investment products and medals with numismatic value

Holders of gold and silver investment products with the Bulmint brand should take into account some specific storage conditions. Gold and silver are precious metals, which are very soft and easy to bend/deform. Investment products must be kept in a place of low humidity where the temperature does not exceed 50 degrees Celsius, in order not to impair the integrity of the package. Please do not use a sharp object on the package or the investment bullion itself – you risk damaging it.

Read more >>

Delivery safety

All Bulmint products are packaged according to the highest criteria established in the world practice. Medal and collectible series are enclosed in capsules and boxes, and the most prominent ones have printed laminated themed packages. The investment gold bars under the Bulmint brand are vacuum-packed in a special blister packaging, designated with the specific product batch and serial number.

Read more >>

Koledari Silver Medal, 31.1g

Metal Silver Weight 31,1 g Dimensions 45 mm Purity Silver 9999 Edging Smooth Quality Proof Available 22 pcs.
115.00 BGN

The new Koledari silver medal is a part of the "Bulgarian customs and traditions" program. The holiday ritualism and the symbolism of the Christmas tradition, which is invariably associated with the Bulgarian Christmas holidays, have inspired the motif of the medal.

The medal is struck in one troy ounce of pure 999/1000 fine silver to reverse proof quality. This type of finish features brilliant and reflective elements motif and the rim, on the matte surface of the silver. The obverse depicts three young men performing the rite of "koleduvane" (carolling). The unifying element of all medals from the program is the reverse - Bulgarian embroidery from the Samokov region, recreated on silver.

The digital colouring of the obverse is the final touch to the composition that emphasizes the relief and creates contrast and definition.

The medal is packed in a luxurious red leather box, accompanied by a certificate of authenticity.

#Bulgarian customs and traditions Program

Bulgarian Customs and Traditions

The Bulgarian Customs and Traditions program is inspired by the ancient traditions that have preserved the spirit of the Bulgarian people throughout the centuries. Bulgarian traditions are an interesting mix of Christian beliefs and pagan rituals. The entire life of many generations of Bulgarians has been directly linked to the cycles of nature and agricultural work.

The Bulgarian Customs and Traditions program includes several collections that present the specific aspects of the Bulgarian customs and traditions. The entire program features color printing of the obverse of the medals, which further emphasizes the deep and detailed relief and makes the composition stand out. Floral details on the reverse of the medal recreate a traditional hand embroidery from the Samokov area.

Koleduvane

Christmas is one of the traditional Bulgarian customs, which is performed from midnight on Christmas Eve to sunrise on Christmas. Over the centuries, its pagan roots have intertwined with Christianity to become an integral part of the Bulgarian holiday rituals.

The Christmas party consists of an odd number of young bachelor men, led by an older man - a "stanenik", who must be married. Preparations for "koleduvane" begin on December 20th (the date is associated with the winter solstice) when the group gathers at the stanenik's home. Then they began to study carols, which, as a rule, could not be performed at other times of the year. This is not an easy task, as a band's repertoire can include about 50 songs.

The costumes of the "koledari" are festive - they must wear a gag and a yamurluk, and they put fur hats (kalpak) on their heads, decorated with wreaths of boxwood, flowers or popcorn. After dinner on Christmas Eve, the group leaves the stanenik's home and walks past the whole village or a pre-determined neighbourhood until sunrise. They sing songs on the streets and in front of the houses to alert the owners of their arrival. According to tradition, the koledari go around the houses at night, because the sun should not catch them on the road.

The carolers are welcome guests and each family prepares to welcome them. The old people say that if koledari do not visit the house, the year will be barren. It is believed that along with songs, blessings and chants, luck and prosperity come into the home.

The koledari sing a song for everyone in the home, starting with the oldest. They sing and bless for health, prosperity and well-being. In acknowledgement, the hosts gift them with money or flour, wine, fruit - whatever they have produced, and the hostess gives a Christmas bread ("harman") to the stanenik. If there is a girl in the house and her beloved is in the group, she should prepare a special piece of bakery and give it to him as an expression of her affection.

The koleduvane ends with a feast for the carolers in the home of the stanenik. It is made between Christmas and St. Ivan's Day (January 6th), when the collected gifts are distributed to the poor, schools and others.

According to folklore, songs and blessings can drive away supernatural creatures such as goblins and karakonjuli, which appear before Christmas so that the new universe can be born and the world reorganized. Koledari's songs and blessings are believed to have the magical power to ward off evil forces and bring good luck to homes in the new year.

Storage

Storage of investment products and medals with numismatic value

Holders of gold and silver investment products with the Bulmint brand should take into account some specific storage conditions. Gold and silver are precious metals, which are very soft and easy to bend/deform. Investment products must be kept in a place of low humidity where the temperature does not exceed 50 degrees Celsius, in order not to impair the integrity of the package. Please do not use a sharp object on the package or the investment bullion itself – you risk damaging it.

Read more >>

Delivery safety

All Bulmint products are packaged according to the highest criteria established in the world practice. Medal and collectible series are enclosed in capsules and boxes, and the most prominent ones have printed laminated themed packages. The investment gold bars under the Bulmint brand are vacuum-packed in a special blister packaging, designated with the specific product batch and serial number.

Read more >>

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